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Normal 0 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE Welcome to Spanish Home Seeker, we are here to help you if you are thinking of buying a villa, apartment, finca or building plot on the Costa Blanca, Spain. Whether you are looking to relocate, buy a holiday home or buy a property to rent out you will find Spanish Home Seeker are ‘The’ company to deal with!
Take a trip through our website, view our many different villas, townhouses and apartments and get a taste of a few of the wonderful Costa Blanca towns. The Costa Blanca is a large area and covers many, many towns from the Metropolis of Benidorm to the villages of the Jalon and Orba valleys.
As diverse as the Costa Blanca is, so are the properties available. You can find studio apartment from €40,000-€50,000 up to 9 bedroom, 7 bathroom villas where prices can reach many millions!
Although we list our own properties for sale we also have unprecedented access to agents and private sellers from around the world, so if you cannot find on our site your exact requirements please send us an email.
 

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Calpe 4 Bedroom 4 Bathroom Villa
Selling price : 399,000 € Detail
Calpe 6 Bedroom, 4 Bathroom Villa
Selling price : 350,000 €Land space : 1025 m² Detail
Denia 3 bed, 2 bath villa overlooking the sea €245,000
Selling price : 245,000 €Living space : 150 m²Land space : 1000 m² Detail
Seafront villa in Moraira
Selling price : 2,850,000 €Living space : 220 m²Land space : 1600 m² Detail

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Spanish Driving Laws and Traffic Offenses

You are hereHome > Tips From Expats > Spanish Driving Laws and Traffic OffensesSpanish Driving Laws and Traffic Offenses
Tips From Expats

by Lonnie – February 28, 2019March 28, 20190After registering your car in Spain, the next thing to do is to understand the Spanish Driving laws. Lack of knowledge on these rules won’t be accepted when charged with traffic offenses. A good start will be to read and understand the violation and offense laws as listed in the Direction General de Traffico (DGT). But if you have no time or don’t know where to begin, don’t worry. This guide will elaborate on what is regarded as a traffic offense by the Spanish government as well as the fines you are likely to pay.
Pedestrians
Pedestrians will face court charges if they exercise, unruly behaviour on the roads.
Pedestrians should cross the roads hurriedly unless there’s a justifiable reason. If caught walking on a crossway slowly, even if it’s a zebra crossing, that will lead to a penalty of €80. (We have never heard of this being enforced, but it is a matter of courtesy anyway!)
It is prohibited to walk in a lane designated for vehicles or bicycles. If caught, the offender will pay €200 fine.
Pedestrians must not walk along the road or crossroads at spots that are not designated for crossing. Failure to do that attracts a penalty of €80.
Lack of adhering to the pedestrain traffic lights will see the offender paying a fine of €200.
Dangerous and Prohibited Driving
It is an offense to organize or indulge in illegal car races. You’ll pay a €500 fine.
Double parking traffic offenses carry a fine of €200.
You should give way for the vehicle that has the right to that way. Failure to observe that will result in a fine.
A driver should not increase speed when about to be overtaken.
Reversing at the wrong time and place, for instance, on a main road is considered an offense and leads to a penalty of €200.
If caught overtaking a vehicle and driving immediately in front of it you are likely to pay a fine of €200.
Hooting without an appropriate reason attracts a penalty of €80.
Parking on or driving on the pavement is a crime that carries a €200 fine.
Your backplate license ought to be illuminated, or otherwise, you’ll pay a fine of €200.
The condition of the Vehicle
If your vehicle has no bumper a fine of 200€ may be imposed.
Driving without a shirt or with flipflops is considered a crime which is worth €200 Euros. The law believes lack of aa ppropriate driving attire can cause you to be incapable of controlling the situation in times of emergencies.
Flat tires or tires that are in poor condition shouldn’t be on the road unless you want to pay a fine of 200€.
It is a crime to set your vehicle on gear and let it skid purposefully. If caught, you’ll be 100€ out of pocket.
Don’t drive a car that has not passed the ITV (MOT) unless you are ready to pay 500€.
Throwing objects from your car is illegal and attracts a €200 penalty.
Driving a car whose number plate hasn’t been approved or is in poor condition could result in the offender paying an €80 fine.
You’ll pay €200 if caught driving with headphones listening to music.
Licensing
Failing to inform the DGT about changing your address could lead to at least €80 fine.
Failure to renew your driving license attracts a penalty of €200.
If you didn’t carry your license at the time you were stopped, even if it is up-to-date, you’ll face a penalty of not less than €10. It is a criminal offense to drive around when your license has been withdrawn and you’ll pay much more.
You’ll face imprisonment of between 3 to 6 months or do community service for between 31 to 90 days if you are found with a driving license whose points have been used up or you lost the points that were awarded to you legally. The same also applies to a person who drives a vehicle after the judge has revoked their license or has not completed the full term of their ban.
The above are just some of the Spanish traffic laws. But we think driving under the influence of drink or drugs, speeding, or driving without insurance goes without saying. See the DGT website for full rules and regulations.
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Spain's Lesser Cities – Discover Spain Beyond Barcelona and Madrid

You are hereHome > Destinations > Spain’s Lesser Cities – Discover Spain Beyond Barcelona and MadridSpain’s Lesser Cities – Discover Spain Beyond Barcelona and Madrid
Destinations

by Lonnie – March 28, 2019March 28, 20190No trip to Spain is complete without day or weekend trips to the country’s minor cities, which give visitors a better understanding of the country’s history and heritage.
Barcelona and Madrid are obvious stops on most European travel itineraries, but travelers seldom make their way to Spain’s minor cities. However, to do the country justice, it is necessary to spend time in its smaller cities, which offer a wealth of history and culture that rivals that of the larger metropolises.
Toledo
ToledoAs a former capital of the Spanish empire, Toledo was a thriving multicultural city that was home to Christians, Jews and Moors. The town’s top tourist draw is the Cathedral, which boasts an art gallery showcasing the work of such artists as Reubens, Raphael, Goya, and El Greco.
El EscorialThe World Heritage-listed Monastery at El Escorial houses a royal palace, monastery, library, and basilica. The complex was the seat of the Spanish empire during the reign of Philip II, who did his part to stop the spread of Protestantism in Europe. In the Kings’ Pantheon, visitors come across the tombs of five centuries’ worth of Spanish kings.
Valle de Los Caidos
Valle de Los CaidosSet in a dramatic green valley, near El Escorial, it would be easy to miss this monument to Spain’s fallen Civil War soldiers were it not for a large marble cross. Built by political prisoners as a Fascist re-education project during the dictatorship of General Francisco Franco, the monument houses a chapel and the graves of Franco and Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera, Spain’s dictator prior to the Spanish Civil War. However, if you feel uneasy about visiting this monument, you’re not alone – many Spaniards would never consider making a trip here because of its association with Franco and Fascism.
Alcala de HenaresAs the birthplace of Cervantes, Alcala de Henares is the Stratford-Upon-Avon of Spain. A short bus ride from Madrid, the quaint town provides a change of pace from the busy activity of the capital. The house in which Cervantes was born is now a museum and gives visitors a glimpse of 16th-century Spanish life as well as the humble beginnings of Spain’s greatest literary mind. The town is also the home of one of Spain’s oldest universities, the Universidad de Alcala, ensuring that there is an active student scene.
SalamancaSalamanca is to Spain what Oxford is to England. One of the great Renaissance cities of Europe and home to one of the country’s most important universities, the town once attracted students from as far as France and Italy, including the likes of Cervantes, Hernan Cortes and Ignatius Loyola. The large student population also provides this town with a bustling nightlife. The Plaza Mayor is considered to be more beautiful than the one found in Madrid, a spectacular sight when it is lit up at night. When you arrive at the 12th century Romanesque Cathedral, try locate the frog and the astronaut carved into the exterior.
SegoviaSegovia’s most recognizable landmark is the ancient Roman aqueduct. It is best viewed at Azoguejo Square, where it reaches its highest height of 28 meters. However, the highlight of most visits is the Alcazar, an 11th-century castle famous for being Walt Disney’s inspiration for the Cinderella castle at Disneyland.
GranadaGranada holds as much significance in Spain’s history as does Boston and Philadelphia in the history of the United States. The city was the last Moorish stronghold before the Christian reconquest in 1492. The Alhambra, a beautiful, imposing Muslim palace, citadel and fortress, is one of the top attractions in Spain. With so much Muslim influence to be seen and felt throughout the city, you may at times wonder if you were in North Africa rather than Europe.
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The Spanish Property Crash of 2008 – Why Did it Happen?
Real Estate

by Lonnie – April 24, 2020April 24, 20200 The dramatic fall in the price of Spanish property in 2008 had been predicted for years and owed little to the effects of the global recession.According to market expert Johann Harkness from www.javea-property.com, in simple terms, the collapse of the Spanish property market could be attributed to one simple factor
The Importance of Overseas Property Buyers for the Spanish Economy
Real Estate

by Lonnie – January 21, 2020January 21, 20200 Tourism plays a key role in the Spanish economy. The Spanish culture and weather attract a large number of foreigners to the country every year, with more than 50 million foreign visitors travelling to the cities and seaside resorts, mainly from the more northern regions of Europe.Visitors to Spain do
Why Choose Javea As Your New Home?
Real Estate

by Lonnie – November 8, 2019April 27, 20200 Javea offers a lovely combination of classic Spanish culture that sits comfortably alongside a lively and thriving expat community. If you are looking for year-round sunshine and plenty of people who will gladly help newcomers settle, then this could well be your dream location to begin a new life in
Is Your Property Rental Failing? Here are Three Reasons why…
Real Estate

by Lonnie – September 9, 2019September 9, 20190 1. A Letting Agent You Can TrustGetting the right tenant isn’t always the easiest job in the world. Turning to a letting agency for help is usually the best solution to the problem, but only if you are able to find the right agent that you can trust to act
Moving Abroad – Why It’s Easier Now Than 10 Years Ago
Real Estate

by Lonnie – July 1, 20190 Many people dream of moving abroad. They dream of being able to start a new life in a country of their choosing. 10 years ago this dream was a challenge, but today it’s easier to move abroad than many people realise. Getting life off to a fresh start is magical.
New Rental Law in Spain
Real Estate

by Lonnie – March 27, 2019March 28, 20190 The average rental cost in Madrid for a house of around 85m2 is 1,220€, which is the highest in Spain. This is maybe not surprising as Madrid is the capital of Spain. Following closely behind id y the Balearics, with an average price of 1,170€ for a similar property. The
Selling Your Spanish Property – Tips for a Hassle-Free Sale
Real Estate

by Lonnie – February 25, 2019March 28, 20190 Selling a property In Spain after the 2008 crash was likely to be an overwhelming task. Well, you have to note that even though the market has gone from strength to strength since 2016, selling a home quickly in Spain is not always an easy task. Sometimes, it takes several
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Quick Travel Guide to Segovia

You are hereHome > Destinations > Quick Travel Guide to SegoviaQuick Travel Guide to Segovia
Destinations

by Lonnie – January 15, 2019March 28, 20190Segovia has countless splendors to offer its visitors. From the 1st century Roman aqueduct to the tasty menu options, this historic destination has something for everyone.
Getting There; Madrid from Segovia by Bullet Train
Segovia is easily accessed by car. Alternatively, train and bus are both great options.
Renfe offers an AVE bullet line from the Chamartin station in Madrid; the trip takes about 30 minutes. The train station in Segovia is located 4 km outside the city center, but the bus to the center runs frequently.
Alternatively, the bus from Madrid to Segovia departs from the Principe Pio bus station. The trip takes about an hour and a half depending on traffic, and the Segovia bus station is located only a five-minute walk from the Roman aqueduct in the historic city center.The Roman Aqueduct; Segovia’s Main Attraction

This antique marvel of Roman architecture dominates the beginning of the historic section of Segovia. Large and impressive, this well-preserved aqueduct is twenty centuries old! It was built to bring water to Segovia from the closest river–over 18 km away.
Many restaurant terraces surround the tallest portion of the aqueduct in nice weather, and it is common to see numerous artists painting this grand scene.
The Alcazar of Segovia; Spain’s Fairy Tale Palace
The Alcazar, situated on a tall hilltop, holds a beautiful view of Castilla y Leon, but the castle itself is even more stunning. With its bright blue spires and tall towers, this castle has been an inspiration to countless artists, including Walt Disney.
Madrid is a well-rounded travel destination. With its renowned museums, parks, shopping, entertainment, and gastronomy, this city has something for everyone.The Alcazar began as a Moorish fort, but was captured by Alfonso VI’s Christian troops in the 11th century, and was transformed into a favorite palace of Spanish kings.
Self-tours of the palace are convenient and inexpensive.
La Dama de Las Catedrales Españoles; The Dame of the Spanish Cathedrals
Segovia’s gothic cathedral overlooks the city’s Plaza Mayor, or Main Square. It’s impressive architectural design will stun artists and historians alike.
This cathedral was commissioned in 1525 and built by Juan Gil de Hontañón. His sons completed the project after his death.
Segovian Food; Postres Segoviana
The postres Segoviana, or Segovian desserts, are especially well-known in Spain. Specials include leche frita (or “fried milk”), arroz con leche (rice pudding), and el ponche Segoviano (a typical Segovian cake with marzipan).
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Quick Travel Guide to Amazing Madrid

You are hereHome > Destinations > Quick Travel Guide to Amazing MadridQuick Travel Guide to Amazing Madrid
Destinations

by Lonnie – January 22, 2019April 24, 20200Rich History and Culture Make this Spanish City an Ideal Destination for a Visit or Relocation
Madrid is a well-rounded travel destination. With its renowned museums, parks, shopping, entertainment, and gastronomy, this city has something for everyone.Madrid, the capitol city of Spain, is a centrally located travel hub and a favorite of tourists and locals alike. In recent years Madrid has established itself as a metropolitan city with strong international presence. It is easily accessed by foreign visitors, boasting strong public transportation and a charming blend of international sophistication and true Spanish identity.Madrid has a range of sights to offer its visitors and its local residents, from world-renowned museums, sprawling parks, a large range of shops and markets, plus festivals, bullfighting and sports.
Museums of Madrid: The Prado, The Queen Sofia Art Center, and the Royal Palace
El Museo Nacional del Prado, fondly known as The Prado, is considered one of the world’s most important art museums. Centrally located and easily accessible, The Prado museum houses some of the most historically influential art worldwide, including famous works of Boticelli, Raphael, Goya, El Greco, Titan, and many others.
El Museo Nacional Centro de Arte de Reina Sofia, or the Queen Sofia Art Center, is a downtown museum that has housed contemporary art since its opening in 1986. The former Spanish Museum of Contemporary Art has since been transferred to this six-story building.El Palacio del Real, or the Royal Palace, is no longer a royal residence and is instead open for tours. In addition to the royal rooms, impressive gardens can be found, along with important paintings by prominent artists including Velazquez and El Greco.
Parks of Madrid: Retiro Park and the Temple of Debod
Parks are very important to Madrid’s culture, as they provide shade during the hot summer months and provide a bit of green within a busy city.
Built in 1632, El Parque del Buen Retiro remains Madrid’s largest and most popular park, boasting 15,000 trees, a rowboat filled lake, a sprawling rose garden, and a number of fountains. Also notable is the Palacio de Velazquez, which hosts temporary art and culture exhibitions.
El Parque de la Montaña, or Mountain Park, offers a beautiful view of the city and a very special monument, El Templo de Debod, or the Temple of Debod. When Spain assisted in the relocation of these fourth-century monuments to prevent their flooding, Egypt gifted the nation one of these monuments, the Templo de Debod, as a token of appreciation.
Shopping in Madrid: El Rastro Market and Puerta del Sol
Madrid’s famous flea market, El Rastro, is a historical site that offers every imaginable item and is open every Sunday morning in the La Latina neighborhood.
For everything from popular name brands to Madrid souvenirs, the shopping area of Puerta del Sol holds department stores, independent shops, and the all-inclusive Corte Ingles shopping center.
Madrid Entertainment: Festivals, Bullfights, and Sports
Madrileños enjoy a good party. Some of the more popular and historic fiestas and festivals include May’s Feast Days of San Isidro (patron saint of Madrid), the celebration of Carnival 40 days before Semana Santa, and Easter’s Semana Santa (Holy Week). For more information, see a schedule of specific neighborhood festivals.
Bullfighting is still a vital part of Madrid’s culture, despite growing resistance to the sport. Madrid’s bullring, La Plaza de Toros de Las Ventas del Espíritu Santo (or simply, Las Ventas), hosts bullfights many months of the year. However, the best and most popular time for bullfighting is between the months of May and June. Tickets can be purchased online or at the bullring.
Madrid’s most popular futbol (soccer) team, Real Madrid, plays at the Santiago Bernabeu Stadium. Here it is also possible to find Spain’s national league competing against other countries. Tickets can also be found for Atletico de Madrid at the Vicente Calderon Stadium and for Rayo Vallecano at the Teresa Rivero Stadium.
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La Sagrada Familia – Antoni Gaudi's Living Masterpiece

You are hereHome > Destinations > La Sagrada Familia – Antoni Gaudi’s Living MasterpieceLa Sagrada Familia – Antoni Gaudi’s Living Masterpiece
Destinations

by Lonnie – March 15, 2019March 28, 20190Famously “unfinished”, Antoni Gaudi’s Temple Expiatori Sagrada Familia in Barcelona is a modern masterpiece in the making.
Work on the Sagrada Familia began in 1882, and it is now almost a century, and since Gaudi’s death in 1926, but this spectacular temple is not projected to be finished until 2030 (and that barring any unforeseen catastrophes, which have occasionally been known to plague the project); yet this stately timeline speaks less of any constructional fecklessness than of the sheer scale of the undertaking. La Sagrada Familia, when finished, will be something akin to a modern-day Chartres. From that perspective, 150 years in the making is more than reasonable.
Architect Antoni GaudiArchitect Antoni Gaudi (1852-1926) is known for his utterly singular, perhaps somewhat eccentric, brand of modern architecture. Gaudi took the stylistic sensibilities of Art Nouveau, the virtuoso workmanship of the Arts and Crafts movement, and the exciting technical innovations of late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and melded them with a distinctive Catalan flavour into his unique vision. Though often associated with the Modernisme school of such Barcelona architects as Puig i Cadafalch and Domenech i Montaner, Gaudi truly stands alone.
Though not as startlingly sensational as that of colleague Frank Lloyd Wright, Gaudi’s life was not uneventful. Something of a sybaritic dandy in his younger years, Gaudi became a staunch Catalan nationalist, and was arrested in 1924 for refusing to speak Spanish to a policeman on Diada des Catalanes, the day marking the Spanish conquest of Catalunya in 1714.
It was during his work on the Sagrada Familia, however, that Gaudi became seized with an even more fervent passion: planning the monumental cathedral apparently inspired within him a deep religiosity. He moved into his workshop on the Sagrada Familia site and stopped working on other projects, devoting himself entirely to the temple meant, in his words, to expiate the world’s sins. When he was run over by a streetcar in 1926 (the accident which eventually killed him), passersby mistook him for a tramp and took him to a pauper’s hospital. Pleased with the mistake, Gaudi refused to be moved by his friends, and died there a few days later, happy with the trappings of poverty.
La Sagrada FamiliaThe life of the building itself has not been immune to incident. Gaudi first became involved in planning for the Sagrada Familia in 1883, and work continued uninterrupted under associates after his death. With the onset of the Spanish Civil War, the building site was targeted by anti-Church revolutionaries, who torched the building and destroyed many of Gaudi’s elaborate models.
The models have been painstakingly pieced back together over the years with the help of plans, photographs and (latterly) intricate forensics. One of the unique pleasures of visiting the Sagrada Familia is the ability actually to watch not only the workmen constructing the building, but also the teams of gifted sculptors recreating models in the workroom beneath the nave, part of the Sagrada Familia Museum in the basement.
Gaudi and NaturalismIt is the sculptural quality of the Sagrada Familia that is most striking, a quality both dictated by and complementary to the architect’s tremendous affinity for organic forms. While Gaudi was more than comfortable with the technical innovations of the modern age, he eschewed the strict geometric, even mechanical, aesthetic of much of modernist design, favouring a deeply naturalistic approach. This naturalism, while also archetypically evident particularly in his designs for Park Guell and La Pedrera, reaches dizzying heights in the Sagrada Familia, reflecting as it does a humble yet glorified respect for the natural world as God’s creation.
Yet the almost outrageous emphasis on sculptural, organic form belies the intensely complex geometry of the building design. In addition to the museum, the site houses a schoolhouse designed and built by Gaudi for the education of the original on-site workmen’s children, which now displays architectural plans, figures and computer-generated models demonstrating the engineering complexities of the design.
In marrying this structural elegance and sophistication with a trademark exuberance, the Sagrada Familia perfectly encapsulates the spirit of Gaudi.
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Is Your Property Rental Failing? Here are Three Reasons why…

You are hereHome > Real Estate > Is Your Property Rental Failing? Here are Three Reasons why…Is Your Property Rental Failing? Here are Three Reasons why…
Real Estate

by Lonnie – September 9, 2019September 9, 201901. A Letting Agent You Can Trust
Getting the right tenant isn’t always the easiest job in the world. Turning to a letting agency for help is usually the best solution to the problem, but only if you are able to find the right agent that you can trust to act in your best interests.
There are a number of ways you can increase your chances of getting an agent that will do just that. Firstly, only choose letting agents who are members of the sectors professional bodies, or of the National Approved Letting Scheme. It is also essential to check that they are registered with a Property Redress Scheme and that they hold professional indemnity insurance. These all safeguard you should anything go wrong at the letting agents end; while problems are rare with good agencies, they will be the ones who prepare for all eventualities. Before you start your search you also need to be clear what you want from your agent in terms of your flats to let. Do you just want them to list the property? Or are you looking for more comprehensive ongoing support? Read through what the company offers you, and the tenant carefully to check that it meets your needs and your expectations. Take the same approach with the contract and fees. As the landlord, the agency is working primarily on your behalf, so you can expect to have to pay for this service, but it is good to know exactly what you are paying and what you are getting for yourmoney. You can also look at Guaranteed Rental Schemes like what Yellow Slate offer.
2. You Are Not Meeting Your Responsibilities
One of your responsibilities as a landlord is to ensure that the individual in question has the legal right to rent within the UK. One of your responsibilities as a landlord is to either complete a set of checks on your prospective tenants or to ensure that these checks are completed by your letting agents. These checks ensure that the individual is the person they are claiming to be and that they have a right to be in the country. The checks apply to all tenants aged over 18, including those who are not named on the tenancy agreement. This would include the children of named tenants, or other young adults living as part of the household. When requesting documents as evidence of age and right to remain you must ensure that you are provided with the original documents and that they belong to the individuals in question. You should make copies of these documents and keep the copies in a safe place for at least a year after the end of the tenancy. If any of your tenants have a limit on the time they are allowed to remain, it is your responsibility to recheck the documents before they are due to expire. If you are unsure of the status of a possible tenant, or find they have no right to remain you must inform the Home Office and cannot legally rent any accommodation tothem.
3. You Are Not Listing Your Property Factually
A lot of people do not put the right effort into their listing or the correct information. We will use a studio flat to illustrate this. It is important to be able to distinguish studios from other types of properties and to list them correctly when looking to let. Follow this quick guide to ensure you have the property listed under the right heading. A let can encompass any type of property, including flats, apartments, houses, and studios. It is important to list your property under the right category as it will help attract the right tenants and save you time on unnecessary viewings. The main areas of confusion tend to come from the difference between a one-bedroom flat or apartment and a studio apartment. While the terms are often used interchangeably, there are crucial differences that will matter to your tenant, and potentially to the rent you charge. A one-bedroom flat is exactly that, a self-contained flat with a separate room for the bedroom. There are often also separate rooms for the living area and kitchen, and of course the bathroom. A studio differs in that everything, except the bathroom, is encompassed within the one room. The floor space of that room is divided into areas and each area represents one room in a general flat. Studios appeal more to single individuals who do not need to worry about privacy or space as none of the spaces are shared. Studios also tend to be cheaper to rent than one-bedroom flats although that is dependent on the area the let is in.
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Guest Posting | Write for Us | Spanish Real Estate

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We at Spanish Home Seeker believe that guest blogging is a great way to share ideas and create a community-minded blog. We provide a platform where amateurs and experts alike can share their views and experiences on anything related to moving to Spain, and thereby help the community as a whole.
We believe that guest posting is a win-win situation for both the guest blogger and the host. We receive a creative interesting article for our site, and you get SEO benefits and exposure to readers who otherwise may not find you.
How to Guest Post On Spanish Home Seeker
Guest posting and submitting an article at Spanish Home Seeker is straightforward, as we have made it as simple as sending an email. All you need to do is write your article in a document with hyperlink(s) in place and send it to the address provided below.
However, before sending, take a moment to follow our posting guidelines. Failure to follow the instructions will likely cause your post to be rejected, so please make sure all steps are followed!
Submission Guidelines
Content must be unique, written exclusively for Spanish Home Seeker, and not previously published.
Content must be of interest to an audience interested in buying a home in Spain or travelling to the country.
Before you submit an article, please check for grammar errors. We reserve the right to correct small errors before publishing, but if your submission contains numerous errors, it will be rejected.
Contributor posts should be at least 500 words in length and preferably include at least one photograph, preferably taken by you.
Free posts are permitted only one link in an author bio at the foot of the article. Paid posts may contain up to two links anywhere within the content.
Publishing
We will publish all posts that adhere to the submission guidelines within 14 days. If you want your post published within one working day, please use the paid option.
Paid Posting
Unpaid posts will be published within 14 working days, but we offer a paid guest posting option where your post will go live within just one working day. A paid post also allows you to place up to two links within your content – you are not restricted to one link in the author bio as with the free option.
If you would prefer to post using our paid option, email your article to the address provided below, with “Paid Guest Post” in the subject line. We will send you a PayPal payment address. once the payment is paid, your post will be published within one working day. We are located in the UK, so bear in mind we work GMT office hours.
The cost of a paid guest post is $30.
Submission Details
Attach your articles in an email to [email protected]
Please include “Free Guest Post” or “Paid Guest Post” in the subject line of your article submission We reserve the right to reject posts that do not meet our quality guidelines.

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Great Spanish Traditions – The Menu Del Dia

You are hereHome > Spanish Lifestyle > Great Spanish Traditions – The Menu Del DiaGreat Spanish Traditions – The Menu Del Dia
Spanish Lifestyle

by Lonnie – March 2, 2019March 28, 20190Eating out is a major activity in Spain, and you’ll find fabulous cafes and restaurants to suit all budgets. You have probably seen a set-price meal advertised in many restaurants and bars, labelled the ‘menu-del-dia’ or menu of the day.
The menu of the day is a great Spanish tradition which is offered in many eateries whether you are in a resort town, in a city or even a tiny village in the country. A typical menu del dia will give you a choice of a couple of starters, main courses, and desserts and will be offered at a low price which usually includes wine, bread. Sometimes a coffee will also be thrown in but you can usually expect to pay extra for the coffee or other drinks.
You’ll find the menu of the day is typically served only for a few hours a day, often between 1 pm to 3 pm, though some places will also offer an evening version, from around 8 pm to 10 pm – the time workers will be looking for something to eat. Traditionally, the menu of the day was for laborers who couldn’t get home for lunch. Some believe General Franco began the tradition of the menu del dia, others credit it to his Minister of Information and Tourism, Manuel Fraga. It seems whoever had the idea originally designed a set-price tourist menu in the mid ’60s, but in the early 70s replaced it with the menu del dia, so it was designed as a tourist attraction as opposed to an idea to lower-paid workers. Whether for tourists or workers, or both, today, it still suits its original purpose of providing a complete three-course nutritional meal that is excellent value for money.
If you are on holiday and on a budget, taking advantage of the menus of the day is a great way to get your money to go further. It’s also a good way to find some of the best food places in town as the number of locals eating in an establishment demonstrates the food is good even if it is a low price.
If you see a restaurant is offering a menu of the day, be advised to arrive punctually because many of these places soon become full and you might find it difficult to get a table. Alternatively, slip in at the end, arriving half an hour before the end, as most of the workers will have left by then.Like in any country, pay attention to where you choose to eat in Spain. If you see a menu del dia advertised on a chalkboard it is likelier to be made with fresh and seasonal ingredients than if advertised on a permanent printed menu. Look for the menu del dia places that are full at 1:30 p.m. it shows people are hurrying to be served because it is good. If it’s 1:30 or 2:30 p.m. and there are few diners chances are, that restaurant is not the best option.

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The Procedures and the Costs of Starting a Business in Spain
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